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Yes

"Alright, here goes. I'm old. What that means is that I've survived (so far) and a lot of people I've known and loved did not. I've lost friends, best friends, acquaintances, co-workers, grandparents, mom, relatives, teachers, mentors, students, neighbors, and a host of other folks. I have no children, and I can't imagine the pain it must be to lose a child. But here's my two cents.

I wish I could say you get used to people dying. I never did. I don't want to. It tears a hole through me whenever somebody I love dies, no matter the circumstances. But I don't want it to "not matter". I don't want it to be something that just passes. My scars are a testament to the love and the relationship that I had for and with that person. And if the scar is deep, so was the love. So be it. Scars are a testament to life. Scars are a testament that I can love deeply and live deeply and be cut, or even gouged, and that I can heal and continue to live and continue to love. And the scar tissue is stronger than the original flesh ever was. Scars are a testament to life. Scars are only ugly to people who can't see.

As for grief, you'll find it comes in waves. When the ship is first wrecked, you're drowning, with wreckage all around you. Everything floating around you reminds you of the beauty and the magnificence of the ship that was, and is no more. And all you can do is float. You find some piece of the wreckage and you hang on for a while. Maybe it's some physical thing. Maybe it's a happy memory or a photograph. Maybe it's a person who is also floating. For a while, all you can do is float. Stay alive.

In the beginning, the waves are 100 feet tall and crash over you without mercy. They come 10 seconds apart and don't even give you time to catch your breath. All you can do is hang on and float. After a while, maybe weeks, maybe months, you'll find the waves are still 100 feet tall, but they come further apart. When they come, they still crash all over you and wipe you out. But in between, you can breathe, you can function. You never know what's going to trigger the grief. It might be a song, a picture, a street intersection, the smell of a cup of coffee. It can be just about anything...and the wave comes crashing. But in between waves, there is life.

Somewhere down the line, and it's different for everybody, you find that the waves are only 80 feet tall. Or 50 feet tall. And while they still come, they come further apart. You can see them coming. An anniversary, a birthday, or Christmas, or landing at O'Hare. You can see it coming, for the most part, and prepare yourself. And when it washes over you, you know that somehow you will, again, come out the other side. Soaking wet, sputtering, still hanging on to some tiny piece of the wreckage, but you'll come out.

Take it from an old guy. The waves never stop coming, and somehow you don't really want them to. But you learn that you'll survive them. And other waves will come. And you'll survive them too. If you're lucky, you'll have lots of scars from lots of loves. And lots of shipwrecks."

GSnow on reddit | link

Pulp! from Beyond the Veil in Seven Days

Dan Bolles wrote an amazing article about Pulp! from Beyond the Veil. My friends Cody and Zach have done an incredible job with the writing, direction, production and most of all passion. I'm proud as pie to be a cog in the machine. Here's to many more glorious episodes of Pulp!

Check out the articale here: "Vermonters Create Creepy Podcasts" by Dan Bolles, Seven Days

And feast your ears on the Pulp! Season 1 finale here.

Wotown

This summer I set about bringing a crazy idea to fruition. I wanted a community dance party, and I wanted it to be fun and accepting of the widest possible net. All i could think about was Motown music. And thus "Wotown" was born!

If you're completely clueless as to what I'm talking about, just read the link below...

... I'm just stunned at the kind words. My good friend Taylor Long, the author, really captured the feeling and spirit of Wotown so perfectly.

Seriously, I can't thank you enough.

Wotown by Taylor Long on the Junction Magzazine

At some point after the last Wotown event is done, I'll write up some debriefing thoughts and post them here...

Keyscrape

Automations save you from doing annoyingly repetetive things. Things such as pulling public ssh keys from your users' github page. keyscrape will do just that, and save the output in a nice, easy to read text file. You could easily use this to populate an inventory of some sort.

It's all nice and dockerized, too...

Check it out on GitHub

Lift off!

Re-launching... everything

It's a whole new start. Finally getting my online life situated and streamlined. I've been busy filling out the content on this site, but stay tuned for more blogging.